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What to Keep in Mind while Implementing Wellness Programs for Employees

HR Tech Outlook | Wednesday, March 17, 2021

Also, with best-in-industry wages, everyone has heard of businesses that can't keep decent employees. In certain cases, candidates leave because of ineffective supervisors or a toxic work environment.

Fremont, CA: Employee health is a concept that has been around for a long time. Over time, the variety of programs available in this region has expanded from simple employee protection and insurance/health benefits to include their overall well-being. Companies nowadays provide their staff with stress management classes, therapy sessions, and various wellness programs.

As a result of the Covid-19 pandemic's forced work-from-home situations, several businesses have announced workshops on mental health and anxiety management. All of these programs have one goal in mind: to make workers healthier and happier. And, hopefully, a happier employee would produce better job results. For both employers and staff, this is a win-win scenario.

Top 10 Financial Wellness Solution Companies - 2020However, a recent study indicates that health programs have not lived up to their billing. Various studies in the United States have found mixed results when it comes to wellness programs. The majority of businesses did not show an increase in employee output or a reduction in absenteeism as a result of wellness programs. Is this to say that health programs are merely a fad that should not be taken seriously? Until rejecting the concept of employee health, consider the following:

It will be unsuccessful if the employee wellness initiative is merely an afterthought added because every other organization is doing it. If the wellness program isn't well-thought-out, adding one yoga session every month or holding a one-time seminar on stress management won't help.

Also, with best-in-industry wages, everyone has heard of businesses that can't keep decent employees. In certain cases, candidates leave because of ineffective supervisors or a toxic work environment. Wellness programs can be compared to the same analogy. While it will sound appealing to discuss, no one would sign up if it is not beneficial to the employee. Offering smartwatches to workers who spend the majority of their time in conference rooms may not be the most effective way to involve them in wellness programs. It also doesn't help to announce a stand-alone initiative once every few months to finish the to-do list.

A wellness program should cover topics that are important to employees. Companies that gave unlimited sick leave to workers who had to work from home during the pandemic are a good example.

See also: Top HR Technology Companies

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