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Three Challenges Faced in Employee Onboarding

HR Tech Outlook | Friday, April 16, 2021

Three Challenges Faced in Employee OnboardingMissing tools and unauthorized approvals can result from poor communication between departments. Dependent processes may build-up, leaving new hires bored, irritated, or both.

FREMONT, CA: Employee engagement, productivity, and turnover can all be improved with proper onboarding. Inability to get started on the right foot with new recruits, on the other hand, will result in many of them leaving within months of being hired, wasting the high costs of hiring top talent.

Inconvenient cross-departmental manual procedures often hamper onboarding systems. They fall short of increasing employee standards and have a scarcity of data for benchmarking and performance evaluation.

Here are three challenges in employee onboarding:

Frustrating, Manual Processes Persist

Although other critical business processes such as IT operations and customer service management have become automated and digitized, many HR departments still use manual or paper-based onboarding workflows.

Recruiters, applicants, and hiring managers often communicate in a tangle of email, phone calls, and texts. Using spreadsheets and checklists to handle processes is difficult. Paper forms that must be digitally converted are prone to costly mistakes and even regulatory penalties.

Turnover from Bad Onboarding is Costly

Poor onboarding experiences hinder a company's ability to retain talented new employees, who are increasingly becoming expensive to recruit and hire and have various options elsewhere. Companies can no longer bear the risks of providing a bad onboarding experience, given how much it costs to fill vacancies.

Rrequires Interdepartmental Cooperation

Onboarding new hires are one of the few business processes that touch so many aspects of an organization. While HR teams are typically in charge of the onboarding process, it also necessitates the active participation of other business units. Relationships between these stakeholders are often hazy, with little accountability.

Missing tools and unauthorized approvals can result from poor communication between departments. Dependent processes may build-up, leaving new hires bored, irritated, or both. Some HR departments can handle this level of difficulty on their own. Still, businesses can't rely on it when 28 percent of employees leave within 90 days of starting a new job due to a bad onboarding experience.

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