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Scam Job Offers: Six Warning Signs

HR Tech Outlook | Monday, May 31, 2021

Never give out your credit card details, bank details, address, or social security number until you have been hired and fill out your IRS forms.

Fremont, CA: Job offer scams target desperate job seekers. If you happen to be that desperate job seeker, you have difficulty telling who's good from who's bad. What are some methods you can use to discern between legitimate and bogus job offers? Here are ten warning signs that will keep you on track.

"No experience required"

Experience is always necessary, even for entry-level positions. It is always necessary to have some work experience, and any job that states otherwise is a con. Everyone cannot do every job.

A crazy amount of cash

If it seems too good to be true, it probably is. A pay offer that is above average, particularly without proper vetting, can be a major red flag. First, you want the manager to evaluate you on your merits and then offer you the big money.

Fees

Never give anyone your credit card information. Never give anyone money. A job that asks you for these things is a scam. You don't have to spend money on training, software, or insurance. You don't have to. Just run away.

Personal Information Requests

Never give out your credit card details, bank details, address, or social security number until you have been hired and fill out your IRS forms. People who ask for this information first are scammers.

Typographical errors in the listing

Or Poor grammar. Incomplete sentences. Anything seems to have been generated or translated by a computer program rather than written by an intelligent human. Usually, if there are flaws in the job description, there are flaws.

Calls after business hours

A request made before/after office hours probably isn't acceptable. In industries that claim to operate 24/7, hiring managers should call you at a reasonable time. This is your right.

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