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Key Compliance Issues Every HR Official should Know

HR Tech Outlook | Thursday, January 06, 2022

Child labor, the number of hours worked, overtime, the minimum wage, and recess time are all covered by the Hour and Wage Laws. Even though the Fair Labor Standards Act is a federal law that establishes overtime and minimum wage requirements, many states have their own laws.

Fremont, CA: All organizations must follow the rules, regulations, and laws of the state in which they operate. HR must be proactive in order to ensure that the organization meets its legal obligations. This includes not only meeting the employees' health and safety requirements, but also making sure that they receive their statutory and contractual workplace rights.

Following are some issues that every HR official needs to stay aware of.

Hour and Wage Compliance Problems

Child labor, the number of hours worked, overtime, the minimum wage, and recess time are all covered by the Hour and Wage Laws. Even though the Fair Labor Standards Act is a federal law that establishes overtime and minimum wage requirements, many states have their own laws.

When a company does not keep track of its employees' attendance and time, compliance issues regarding wage inaccuracy are bound to arise. This error is most likely to occur in businesses that still manually enter payroll information. Human resources must ensure that all employees are fairly compensated based on their working hours.

Workplace safety compliance

The OSH Act was enacted to ensure that employees work in safe conditions. The Occupational Health and Safety Administration enforces the Act, which states that every employee has the right to safe and healthy working conditions.

Despite the fact that the Act is still being changed and corrected due to administrative issues, HR officials should keep an eye on reporting and recording requirements.

Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA)

A federal law that allows employees to take up to twelve weeks off for medical or family reasons. This act protects employees from losing their jobs if they need to take an extended leave.

Employees who require twelve weeks of unpaid leave should be permitted to return to work without penalty. As an HR official, you must ensure that employees are treated fairly in accordance with FMLA regulations.

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