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Four Biggest Mistakes in Employee Engagement

HR Tech Outlook | Friday, February 26, 2021

Studies show that excessive micromanagement results from a lack of confidence in managers and signals to employees that they do not have the ability to solve problems.

FREMONT, CA: It's no secret that the pandemic has changed the look and feel of work, with more individuals working remotely than ever before. Consequently, it has affected employee engagement as well.

You can connect your employees with virtual office parties, team meetings, and other social opportunities as a business leader.

Here are four problems to avoid in employee engagement:

No Employee Recognition

Seek ways to provide appropriate recognition to improve employee engagement when the team operates remotely. Find ways to show how much you value, from celebrating individual successes to providing meaningful benefits and incentives.

Remote work challenges workers and managers in critical ways, and one of the most pressing issues should be employee engagement. It saves time by adhering to the status quo and hoping for better business performance, but it does not solve fundamental problems. It is time to introduce new ways to empower the employees and improve loyalty, efficiency, and overall satisfaction.

Forgetting the Company Purpose in Day-to-Day Work

Most workers had regular in-person reminders of the intent of their business before the transition to remote work. A change in the environment has deeply altered the morale of the workforce.

Remind team members of the value of the business and how they are contributing to its growth. By encouraging them to do things that they enjoy outside of work, you will also encourage staff. This would improve their overall happiness, leading to better motivation and commitment to the workplace. You may also provide educational opportunities to team members who want to enhance their abilities further.

Requiring Attendance at Office Events

Socialization can, even virtually, increase the morale of employees and improve mental health. While using these virtual hangs to reinforce those areas might be tempting, try not to make these events mandatory.

For those who would rather opt-out, mandatory events often do more harm than good. Make these gatherings voluntary instead of requiring participation to allow workers time to pursue interests and activities they enjoy. If they can spend their spare time on enjoyable tasks that genuinely involve them, workers would be better prepared to prevent burnout.

Micromanaging Employees Remotely

Micromanagement frequently suppresses the efficiency and morale of employees. Studies show that excessive micromanagement results from a lack of confidence in managers and signals to employees that they do not have the ability to solve problems. Micromanagement hurts workers' self-worth, hinders innovation, inhibits upward growth, wastes time, and raises turnover. Instead of constantly correcting your team's work, encourage staff to take control of their day-to-day duties and feel connected to their job, especially when working remotely.

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