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Common Mistakes Responsible for Huge Branding Fails

HR Tech Outlook | Tuesday, August 17, 2021

Employer branding includes both formal human resource and recruiting marketing activities and some more informal features such as employee word-of-mouth and, of course, online social media dialogues

FREMONT, CA: In a competitive market, a strong employer brand is a need for attracting, recruiting, and retaining good individuals. All of these variables come down to how candidates see a brand as a potential place of employment. It's simply a company's reputation as perceived through the eyes of the people who already work there. Employer branding includes both formal human resource and recruiting marketing activities and some more informal features such as employee word-of-mouth and, of course, online social media dialogues.

There's a lot on the line if something goes wrong, so it's best to get prepared. So, what are some of the most typical employer branding blunders, and what can you do to avoid them?

  • It's not the corporate brand

When companies build an employer brand that is too similar to their corporate brand, they frequently do it wrong. The issue is that the business brand is geared toward customers, not candidates. The tone and language are different. The message must originate from somewhere else.

  • HR may not have strong marketing support

Most human resources professionals are familiar with some aspects of marketing, but it is not one of their core areas of expertise, so they seek assistance from the marketing department. On the other hand, the marketing staff is focused on selling products and does not always have time to train HR on how to build an employer brand.

  • Weak Employer Value Proposition

The organization has not built a compelling enough employer value proposition (EVP) for prospects, which is one of the key reasons why the employer brand fails. It must be genuine, relevant to what candidates are looking for, and effective in generating positive outcomes. Calling one's culture their EVP is the worst thing anyone can do. Instead, the EVP encompasses all aspects of the organization that contribute to it being a happy and effective workplace. It's the simple things that make a positive experience for employees.

  • Forgetting to monitor departing employees

Employees that choose to leave the company may have strong feelings about their time there. It can end up being broadcast across various platforms, harming the employer's brand. Employers must be aware of their employees' experiences when they leave the company because it can have long-term implications.

  • Management doesn't demonstrate the brand.

It's one thing to put in the effort to build a strong employer brand; it's quite another for executives to embrace it and learn to walk the walk. New hires will immediately notice if the company has supervisors or a senior team who do not uphold the brand's ideals. And, if the misalignment is severe enough, it may cause those recruits to flee, putting business back in the position of having to hire all over again.

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